The Alpine Butterfly Knot

As someone who has done a fair amount of sailing in my youth, I like to think I’m more familiar with knots than the average bear. But there was one that I’d heard of in the past but knew little about: the Alpine Butterfly Knot (or Loop). It looks like this:

and it turns out to be jolly useful, but if you just look at it, it’s very tricky to work out how to tie it quickly.

There are lots of different techniques and lots of different YouTube videos about them, but today I found the method I liked the best:

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3 Comments

Climbing instructor taught me very similar technique that seems to give neater tie – before finger grab, move one edge to middle then grab edge cord with finger.

Thanks also for link to Emily’s videos – they seem much fun to explore better at a later date

Thanks Quentin!
This was also a knot that I had only been vaguely familiar with.
As you say, great for climbing because it doesn’t slip and you don’t need access to the ends of the rope.

I think there’s also a way of tying it one-handed. Perhaps an extension of the one you demonstrated?

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